Home / Family Articles / Improving Your Teens Body Image

Improving Your Teens Body Image

Improving Your Teens Body Image
Loading 

Written by:

In this media-obsessed age where images of stars and starlets are scrutinised daily, it can be difficult to know how to ensure your teenager has a realistic and healthy view of their own body.

Healthy Eating

It may be a clich√©, but feeling good really does begin on the inside, so if your teen is eating healthily, they will be inclined to feel and look healthier. Instilling the importance of healthy food is ideally done as early as possible, so introduce as many different kinds of fruits and vegetables into your child’s diet as soon as they are able to eat! Again, this can prove a struggle, as any parent knows a child’s tastes can differ day to day and even hour to hour in some cases, but if the fridge is stocked with greens and processed and junk food are kept to a minimum, your child’s healthy eating will be seen as the norm and not merely an alternative.

Exercise

Keeping fit comes can be enjoyed in many different ways, so even if your teenager abhors all forms of sport, there will be a way they can keep active. Walking and cycling are great ways to get out and about as a family so why not make keeping fit a family event? Children tend to follow by example so if you are involved in a healthy routine then chances are they will be too. If the outdoors isn’t their thing, or they prefer to hang out with their friends, bowling is a great way to exercise gently while allowing them to enjoy time with their peers.

Listen

Boys can be just as affected by social pressures as girls so watch out for signs that they may be feeling conscious of their changing bodies too. The media has a lot to answer for and teenagers often look to pop and TV stars for inspiration. However, it is important that your children are aware of how unrealistic magazines and music videos can be. Remind them of the unrealistic nature of magazines and television, but be careful not to ostracise yourself by being too critical of stars they love.

Set an example

Improving Your Teens Body ImageIf you are negative about your body, then chances are your child will pick up on this and begin feeling that way about themselves. Referring to yourself or your partner as fat, or saying that you wish you looked like such and such may not seem harmful but the more your child hears conversations like this, the more likely they are going to be made to think of their own body image and even become obsessed with it. Positive reinforcement allows your child to be happy with who they are and what they look like. Pay them compliments about their appearance and about little achievements around the house to boost their confidence. Little things like this really can help to build confidence.

Emphasise other attributes

For a 21st Century teenager it can appear that everything is about appearances, but you can help them see that there are other things in life worth thinking about. Hobbies are a fantastic way of both building talents and confidence. Sign them up for a sport they love, music lessons, or even local volunteering opportunities. This will give your teenager a wider range of interests to focus on and allow them to see the importance of other aspects of life, rather than just appearance.

If you believe your teenager is suffering due to a preoccupation with their appearance and it is impacting upon their physical or mental health, speak to your GP or other health professional.

GD Star Rating
loading...

Share

Comments

About Denise Morgan

Profile photo of Denise Morgan

About Denise Morgan

Denise has five years' experience writing for various web-based companies. During this time she has also contributed to magazine articles and brochures. In addition to writing, Denise is a gigging singer/songwriter and is proud to have featured on the first series of BBC One's The Voice UK, having been selected by the great Sir Tom Jones. Denise is mother to the most talented and ridiculously intelligent two year old that has ever been and ever will be (until she creates another one that is). This kind of hyperbole is restricted only to her progeny and is not a reflection of her usual writing styles... Denise and her son live in Manchester along with their five cats - yes that's right, five.

View all posts by