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10 reasons to shop locally

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We all lead busy lives and sometimes it’s easier to just do all the weekly shopping at the supermarket. However, by doing so our local high streets are in danger of disappearing. Here are 10 reasons to shop locally and why.

There’s more choice than you think

Often people presume that the supermarkets sell more, but you could be surprised by the amount of variety and choice available on the high street. The local fruit and veg shop will stock a wide selection, as well as supplying other essentials such as eggs and milk.

Saves money

We’re made to think that the larger shops are cheaper overall, but this isn’t always the case. Shopping locally means you’ll save on transport costs by travelling less and there’s also the option of walking. Local stores often stock a wider selection of locally sourced produce, which can be cheaper than the mass produced alternatives. It also saves you time, as you can pop in quickly on your way home.

Maintains services

Consumers are quick to complain when their local shops start to close down. However, these are the same people who don’t make the best use of the facilities. We need to use our local shops in order to keep them running. Without customers they wouldn’t be able to survive. By having more people shopping locally, more shops will stay open and the variety of goods will be maintained.

Offers something unique

Local shops are not as cold and soulless as high street chains. They have the opportunity to provide the goods that local customers actually want and have a better knowledge of what’s needed. They can stock a particular locally produced item if they believe it will sell. They are also able to offer a higher quality of service and can order in specific items if a customer requests them.

Better for the environment

Goods in local shops have often travelled far less than the comparable goods in a supermarket. They can stock locally grown and sourced items that do not need to be shipped from abroad. The customers also live closer, reducing the impact of transport on the environment.

shop locally

More jobs

If more people shop locally then the stores will be able to employ more staff. This will provide these workers with more money to spend and reinvest into the local economy. Research shows that local communities receive twice as much benefit from money that’s spent locally to money that’s spent in a large supermarket.

Supports local causes

Local shops are more likely to help out with community events and good causes, such as those run by schools and charity groups. This could be by donating their time, money or produce.

Open to all

Out of town stores can be extremely restrictive in who has access to them. They’re generally limited to those with their own vehicles, which prevents the elderly and young people from using the facilities. Local shops are far easier to get to, even for those who have to rely on public transport.

There for the customers

You will generally find a better level of customer service on the high street. These shopkeepers value their customers and work hard to retain their business. They won’t stay open long if they don’t treat them well.

Keeps the high street open

If a shop closes, it’s not just bad for that particular business. It can be an issue for the whole community. Often other vital services, including healthcare facilities, hairdressers and food outlets, will also start to shut down.

Next time you need some groceries, why not check out what your local high street can offer. Remember that if you don’t use it you might lose it.

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About Catherine Stern

About Catherine Stern

Catherine Stern is a freelance writer with a background in marketing and PR. She currently writes web content on a range of subjects, from finance and business to travel and home improvements. As a working single mum of two young boys she understands the pressures that today’s working parents face and the topics they want to read about.

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