Home / Lifestyle Articles / Planning your first family holiday

Planning your first family holiday

holiday tips
Loading 

Written by:

Planning Your First Family Holiday

When you’ve had a baby or got children, most parents really feel the need for that break away to unwind and relax from the pressures of every day life. But having a child brings a whole new set of considerations to take into account when planning your first family holiday, from the location to what to pack. You want your holiday to be a great experience for all, not something which leaves you needing another break when you get home!

Consider your childs age

The age of your child might be a deciding factor in where to go. Do you want to take a young baby on a long haul flight to a very hot country or would you rather have your first family holiday a little closer to home? If you’re thinking about going abroad, do check the flight times and weather. Babies can quickly overheat and will need shade so while you might want to soak up the rays from dawn until dusk, your baby won’t.  Look into what amenities are at your possible location; is there a baby pool, shaded areas and facilities for children such as high chairs and cots? If you’re taking a pushchair are there lots of steps or hills to take into consideration? It might seem excessive now but you will appreciate taking the time to find a good resort once you’re there.

Travelling with babies

plNNING YOUR FIRST FAMILY HOLIDAY

Small children or babies on planes aren’t usually the best of mixes. Children get bored quickly and don’t like being confined to a seat for hours. No-one likes listening to a screaming child on a plane or in a car, least of all the parents who are trying to deal with them. Check flight or journey lengths and take lots of activities to keep children amused. Colouring pens, portable games consoles, puzzles, books, magazines and small toys will help occupy them during the journey and make it a more pleasant experience for all.

If you’re travelling with a small baby its easy to forget the amount of stuff they have! Most tourist resorts will sell nappies or formula but they can be expensive. If you’re not sure if you can buy consumables there, make sure you pack enough for your trip. If your baby is bottle fed you may need to take a steriliser or buy pre sterilised disposable bottles to take with you. You may be concerned about baby food in other countries, in which case, consider taking powdered or packaged food with you for your child. Foreign countries and airports have very strict regulations on what food can be transported so if you’re in doubt, speak to the airline.

Childrens travel needs

If your child still needs a pushchair, you might want to consider buying or borrowing a cheaper lighter one if your standard buggy is expensive or cumbersome. Buggy’s will be stored with the luggage in the hold under the plane and may get bashed about in transit. You’ll also be putting it up and down regularly and sometimes a small, light pushchair is better for holidays.

If you’re travelling with a small baby its easy to forget the amount of stuff they have! Most tourist resorts will sell nappies or formula but they can be expensive. If you’re not sure if you can buy consumables there, make sure you pack enough for your trip. If your baby is bottle fed you may need to take a steriliser or buy pre sterilised disposable bottles to take with you. You may be concerned about baby food in other countries, in which case, consider taking powdered or packaged food with you for your child. Foreign countries and airports have very strict regulations on what food can be transported so if you’re in doubt, speak to the airline.

Necessities

When travelling with children, there belongings will probably take up the majority of your weight allowance, so plan what items can be bought out there and whether you need to bring them back. Buckets, spades a parasols are fairly cheap to buy and you can leave them there to save you lugging back home with you. UV tents are also a great idea for kids on the beach. They give them shade and keep them cool if they need to get out of the sun. You can also buy sun screens for buggy’s which block out the harmful UV rays but children can still see out of. Make sure you pack plenty of high factor sun cream too; sunburn can ruin a holiday and is extremely bad for young, delicate skin so make sure it’s applied regularly, especially after they’ve been in the pool or sea. Try and buy it before you travel as you may find it difficult to get abroad and not all countries adhere to the same stringent protection guidelines as the UK.

Holidaying in the UK can mean facing a week or so of unpleasant weather, so don’t rely on the beach as your sole source of entertainment. Look into other activities in the area that will keep the family amused and plan trips to keep it fun in the event of a wash out. It may end up costing much more if you’re paying entrance fees for attractions every day rather than playing on the beach, so do factor this in if your planning a break in the UK.

Most of all enjoy your first family holiday. You will experience memories to last a lifetime so a little careful planning can make all the difference.

butlins 2

Share

Comments

About Rebecca Robinson

About Rebecca Robinson

After spending the last 8 years juggling life as a mum of two, wife and working full time as a Project Manager for a global telecommunications company, Rebecca Robinson made the decision to follow her love of writing and took the plunge; turning her passion into a full time career. Since becoming a full time writer, Rebecca has worked with various media and copy-writing companies and with the ability to make any topic relevant and interesting to the reader, now contributes to The Working Parent on articles ranging from credit cards to teenage relationships. Ever the optimist, Rebecca's dreams for the future include a house in the country filled with children, dogs and horses in the field!

Website: Rebecca Robinson

View all posts by